- Exhibitions & Talks

SilverWorks Studio & Gallery

Ongoing

Monday through Sunday - 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.

Presenter: SilverWorks Studio & Gallery

Location: SilverWorks Studio

Admission: Free

Contact Phone: (301) 634-2228

http://www.silverworksglenechopark.com

 


 

SilverWorks Studio & Gallery is a working silversmith studio and includes an ongoing exhibition, as well as sales, of the work of artist-in-residence Blair Anderson.

Art Glass Center at Glen Echo

Ongoing

Friday, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Saturday, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Sunday, 12 p.m. - 4 p.m.

Presenter: Art Glass Center at Glen Echo

Location: Art Glass Center

http://www.artglasscenteratglenecho.org

 


 

The Art Glass Center gallery's ongoing exhibitions feature the work of resident artists Diane Cabe, Christine Hekimian, Michele Rubin, Bev and Zayde Sleph, and Janet Wittenberg. Sculpture, vessels, functional art, and jewelry are also for sale. Classes are taught year-round for both new and advanced students.

Glassworks

Ongoing

Saturdays - 12 p.m. - 4 p.m.

Presenter: Glassworks

Location: Caretaker's Cottage

Admission: Free

Contact Phone: (301) 634-2280

http://www.glenechoglassworks.com

 


 

Glassworks was the Washington DC area's first glass school. Classes are taught year-round for both new and advanced students. During open studio hours view artists and work and purchase beautiful hand-blown glass.

Place and Displacement

January 26 to March 3, 2019
Saturdays, 1 to 4pm and Sundays, 1 to 7pm
Reception and Gallery Talk: Saturday, January 26, 5 to 7pm

 

Presenter: Photoworks

Location: Photoworks Gallery - First Floor Arcade Building

Contact Phone: (301) 634-2274

http://www.glenechophotoworks.org

 


 

Place and displacement intertwines the series House to House by Patricia Howard and Suburbs by Andrew Currie. In both series, images of inhabited and desolated town and suburbs share a similar sense of alienation produced by powerless and meaningless life. Both subjects of the photographer's stories, Howard's mother and Currie's concrete dwellers, are presented with the same sense of being in a place that is not ideal or a preferred place to be. Alienation is central in Currie's overcast, temperamental, dystopian views of overdeveloped suburbs. In contrast, Howard's installation is trying to understand her mother's constant displacement by retracing and recreating their presence through personal objects and textile.

Out of the Woods: Julia Purinton

February 2 to 24, 2019

Saturdays & Sundays, 12pm to 6pm

Opening Reception: Saturday, February 2, 4 to 6pm

Presenter: Glen Echo Park Partnership for Arts and Culture

Location: Stone Tower Gallery

Admission: Free

Contact Email: info@glenechopark.org

Contact Phone: 301-634-2222

http://glenechopark.org/exhibitions

 


 

The Partnership presents an exhibition of landscape paintings by Julia Purinton. Having evolved from hunter-gatherers, humans learned to think in nature. The devastation of our habitats causes distress and despair, and we naturally find solace in the experience of landscape. Utilizing a familiar vernacular of landscape imagery in her paintings, Purinton explores psychological passage and growth: finding joy, accepting loss, or releasing regret. In the way that fairy tales metaphorically dramatize real life, her paintings illuminate aspects of personal endeavor. Whether the image is a shoreline or a forest, her subject is the importance of nature as a palliative to contemporary social malaise; each piece a meditation on the commonality of human response to the majesty and beauty of the natural world.

 

Opening Reception

Saturday, February 2, 4 to 6pm

Persona Practice: Melanie Ruston

February 2 to 23, 2019

Mondays through Saturdays, 10am to 6pm

Opening Reception: Saturday, February 2, 4 to 6pm

Presenter: Glen Echo Park Partnership for Arts and Culture

Location: Park View Gallery

Admission: Free

Contact Email: info@glenechopark.org

Contact Phone: 301-634-2222

http://glenechopark.org/exhibitions

 


 

In her newest body of work, “Persona Practice,” Melanie Ruston pinpoints intimate moments within different types of human relationships, including one's relationship with oneself.  Often using the human figure, she tells stories about how humans of all ages work hard, communicate, succeed, fail, and try again.  While many of her works are autobiographical, she also draws inspiration from her work as an educator of preschool aged children.  Her research of the Reggio Emilia teaching philosophy led her to the writing of Cesare Musatti, who posited that “A child’s most sought-after goal is to recognize him- or her-self in others,” and that even the development of the youngest child constitutes the “matrix of social life as later developed in adulthood… the foundation for likes and dislikes, for affinities and even for love.” The characters in Ruston’s paintings represent personal and social journeys throughout both childhood and adulthood.

 

Opening Reception

Saturday, February 2, 4 to 6pm

What Words Can't Say: Irene Clouthier

February 2 to 24, 2019

Saturdays & Sundays, 12pm to 6pm

Opening reception: Saturday, February 2, 4 to 6pm

Presenter: Glen Echo Park Partnership for Arts and Culture

Location: Popcorn Gallery

Admission: Free

Contact Email: info@glenechopark.org

Contact Phone: 301-634-2222

http://glenechopark.org/exhibitions

 


 

The Partnership presents an exhibition of sculptural work by Irene Clouthier.  In Clouthier’s work she explores and creates new spaces, environments, strange relationships between scale, objects, backgrounds and the universe that unfold by shifting those elements coming from an existing object or spaceHaving grown up in a hostile environment in a violent city in Mexico, toys and games were an escape. The use of plastic and toys in her work references our own childhood and playfulness, to enact fantasies as a statement about the bubble wrap society we live in, the disposable culture, the loss of sensibility, and the embrace of plastics as the cool material of our emptiness. Her recent sculptural work is an exploration of the complexity of human relationships, love, despair, disappointment, loneliness and feelings of the human condition. She began this exploration after going through a divorce and experimenting with duality and confusion, then it unfolded into exploring just the words, their meaning, and how opposites are also connected, because feelings are always connected. Clouthier finds playful ways to express herself, transforming and presenting the work in a new context and inviting viewers to reflect on what it means in their own relationships.

 

Opening Reception

Saturday, February 2, 4 to 6pm

 

Artist Talk & Closing Reception

Sunday, February 24, 4pm