Art Deco at the Park

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Art Deco at the Park

A talk by Architectural Historian Katie Schank

April 10, 2011

 

Watch the video and download the transcript below.

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Many of Glen Echo Park's buildings and design elements were influenced by Art Deco. Art Deco is a design style characterized by bold, linear symmetry, geometric shapes, and references to sleek, streamlined machinery. The motifs of stylized fountains, lightning flashes, and Aztec and Egyptian references are common features. It is a distinct departure from the flowing asymmetrical organic forms of its predecessor, Art Nouveau.


Art Deco first appeared at the International Exposition of Decorative Arts in Paris in 1925 and flourished in Europe and America throughout the 1930s and early 1940s. It was originally called modern, moderne, or streamlined moderne. The term Art Deco was introduced in 1966 when an exhibition in Paris celebrated the 1925 exposition and took the title of the earlier exhibition, Arts Decoratifs, and shortened it to Art Deco.
 

 

In 2011, the Partnership presented a free public talk by architectural historian Katie Schank, who researched the Art Deco history of Glen Echo Park. To learn more about Art Deco at the Park, watch the videos below, download a transcript of the talk, or download the Art Deco at the Park flyer.

 

Visit our Photo Galleries page to see more photos of the Art Deco style at Glen Echo Park.

 

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Art Deco Video Part 1 Art Deco Video Part 2 Art Deco Video Part 3

 

 

 

This project was financed in part with funds from Heritage Montgomery and Montgomery County Government and with State Funds from the Maryland Heritage Areas Authority, an instrumentality of the State of Maryland. However, the contents and opinions do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Maryland Heritage Areas Authority.

 

Many thanks to Peter Somerville for producing the video of this talk.